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Showing posts with label Jim Rogers. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jim Rogers. Show all posts

Friday, July 5, 2013

Keiser Report: Dumb Luck, Wash Trading & Gold Suppression





In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert discuss the failure to understand English as saviour of the Japanese banking system. While price signals, the language of the market, are so manipulated as to be indecipherable by even those who speak the language. In the second half, Max talks to legendary investor, Jim Rogers, about gold, bonds and China.

Jim Rogers: “This Is Too Insane–And I’m Afraid We’re All Going To Suffer For The Rest Of This Decade”

by bullmarketthinking.com














I was able to reconnect with Jim Rogers this morning out of Spain, legendary co-founder of the Quantum Fund with George Soros, author of Hot Commodities, and chairman of the private Beeland Holdings.
It was an especially powerful interview, as Jim spoke towards the relentless downward pressure on gold, the upward explosion in interest rates, central bank money printing, and how to protect yourself ahead of the disastrous times he sees coming.
When asked if we’re seeing forced liquidation leading the smash down in gold this morning, Jim said, “We certainly are. There are a lot of leveraged players who are now being forced to sell. Usually when you have this kind of forced liquidation, you’re getting closer to a bottom, maybe not the final bottom, but certainly close to a bottom. I even bought a little bit [today].”

Saturday, May 18, 2013

Jim Rogers: The EU goes down the tube as politicians spend cash they don't have

 by rt.com/on-air


Switzerland's cherished banking secrecy is under threat. In the ongoing battle against tax evasion, EU finance ministers have agreed to put pressure on the non-member nation to share its banking data with the Union. Investor Jim Rogers told RT that instead of trying to crack tax havens, EU leaders should address the real problems - like their own unchecked spending habits.

Sunday, April 7, 2013

Jim Rogers: The Yen will be the First to Collapse in the Currency Wars

by Jimrogers1.blogspot.it



Jim Rogers is an author, financial commentator and successful international investor. He has been frequently featured in Time, The New York Times, Barron’s, Forbes, Fortune, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times and is a regular guest on Bloomberg and CNBC.
Wall St for Main St interviewed legendary investor and the author of Street Smarts, Jim Rogers. In this podcast, we discussed the global currency wars and why the Yen will be the first to collapse. Jim will discuss why the situation in Cyprus is a big deal and why Americans should be concerned about it! Also, we discussed gold,silver,copper and the agriculture market. Plus much more!
Jim Rogers started trading the stock market with $600 in 1968.In 1973 he formed the Quantum Fund with the legendary investor George Soros before retiring, a multi millionaire at the age of 37. Rogers and Soros helped steer the fund to a miraculous 4,200% return over the 10 year span of the fund while the S&P 500 returned just 47%.

Friday, March 29, 2013

Jim Rogers Says No Paper Currency Will Be Worth Much Of Anything In 2014/5



JIM ROGERS - All FIAT CURRENCY will be WORTHLESS in 2014. Dont SELL GOLD or SILVER
Legendary investor Jim Rogers sees now as a great time to load up on gold and silver coins - and he's not alone.

A record 7.5 million ounces of silver coins were sold in January as investors hunted for a safe haven investment.

"You can't get [silver coins]. They sell out," Rogers, who owns a rare 2013 silver coin, said on Yahoo! Finance's "The Daily Ticker." "Several mints have run out of coins because everybody's worried about the future of the world."

And 150,000 ounces of American Eagle gold coins were sold in January, the highest monthly total since July 2010.

Jim Rogers: Never In History Has This Been Seen

by jimrogers1.blogspot.it




"I don't trust the data from any government, including the U.S., Jim Rogers said. "We know that governments lie to us. Everybody's printing money, but it cannot go on. This is all artificial." Rogers, who for years has been an outspoken critic of the Feds policies of "Quantitative Easing" says all the money printing is creating false hope that we are in the middle of some kind of super bull market. But in reality, he says, "we're living in a fool's paradise."

Tuesday, March 5, 2013

Jim Rogers On Why He Moved To Asia














by hudsonunionsociety.com

The Hudson Union Society www.hudsonunionsociety.com is where today's leaders come to discuss tomorrow's ideas. If you live not to far from New York, please join us in person. 

n 1973, Jim Rogers co-founded the The Quantum Fund. During the following 10 years, the portfolio gained 4200% while the S&P advanced about 47%. The Quantum Fund was one of the first truly international funds. From 1990 to 1992, Rogers traveled around the world world on motorcycle, over 100,000 miles across six continents, which was picked up in the Guinness Book of World Records. Between January 1, 1999 and January 5, 2002, Rogers did another Guinness World Record journey through 116 countries, covering 245,000 kilometers with his wife, Paige Parker, in a custom-made Mercedes. The trip began in Iceland, which was about to celebrate the 1000th anniversary of Leif Eriksson's first trip to America. In December 2007, Rogers sold his mansion in New York City for about 16 million USD and moved to Singapore.

Tuesday, January 1, 2013

What causes hyperinflations and why we have not seen one yet: A forensic examination of dead currencies











by mises.ca

As anticipated in my previous letter, today I want to discuss the topic of high or hyperinflation: What triggers it? Is there a common feature in hyperinflations that would allow us to see one when it’s coming? If so, can we make an educated guess as to when to expect it? The analysis will be inductive (breaking with the Austrian method) and in the process, I will seek to help Peter Schiff find an easy answer to give the media whenever he’s questioned about hyperinflation. If my thesis is correct, three additional conclusions should hold: a) High inflation and high nominal interest rates are not incompatible but go together: There cannot be hyperinflation without high nominal interest rates, b) The folks at the Gold Anti-Trust Action Committee will eventually be out of a job, and c) Jim Rogers will have been proved wrong on his recommendation to buy farmland.
(Before we deal with these questions, a quick note related to my last letter: A friend pointed me to this article in Zerohedge.com, where the problem on liquidity being diverted back to shareholders in the form of share buybacks and dividends was exposed, before I would bring it up, on my letter of March 4th. )

A forensic analysis on dead currencies

When I think of hyperinflation, I think of dead currencies. They are the best evidence. There is a common pattern to be found in every one of them and no, I am not talking of six-to-eight-figure denomination bills or shortages of goods. These are just symptoms. Behind the death of every currency in modern times, there has been a quasi-fiscal deficit causing it. Thus, briefly, when someone asks: What causes hyperinflations? The answer is: Quasi-fiscal deficits! Why have we not seen hyperinflation yet? Because we have not had quasi-fiscal deficits!

What is a quasi-fiscal deficit?

A quasi-fiscal deficit is the deficit of a central bank. From Germany to Argentina to Zimbabwe, the hyper or high inflationary processes have always been fueled by such deficits. Monetized fiscal deficits produce inflation. Quasi-fiscal deficits (by definition, they are monetized) produce hyperinflation. Remember that capital losses due to the mark down of assets do not affect central banks: They simply don’t need to mark to market. They mark to model.

Monday, October 15, 2012

Jim Rogers : Finance has failed several times in history




Jim Rogers : when i went to Wall Street in the sixties mostly it was backward nobody went to Wall Street , in the fifties sixties and seventies Wall Street was not important then we had a long bull market for thirty years it became extremely important , everybody got an MBA and everybody wanted top go to finance but that happens anytime in history for the first years of the twentieth century finance they were kings then we had the collapse of the thirties it became disastrous again until the eighties but it always worked this way , finance has failed several times in history , many times in history but everything has failed , everything goes to excess and collapses has a long period of bad period then it starts over , like agriculture ......

Sunday, October 7, 2012

The three Big Central Banks, the Japanese, the European and the Americans are all in the game and printing

Jim Rogers : "The central bank in Europe is getting in the party — everybody is in the party. The Chinese are not quite so much in the party as they were before but the three big central banks, the Japanese, the European and the Americans are all in the game and printing."
"Either the world economy is going to get better and commodities are going to go up because of shortages, or they are going to print more money, and throughout history when they printed a lot of money, you protect yourself by owning real assets."

- in NewsMax TV

Click Here to watch the full interview>>>>>

Jim Rogers started trading the stock market with $600 in 1968.In 1973 he formed the Quantum Fund with the legendary investor George Soros before retiring, a multi millionaire at the age of 37. Rogers and Soros helped steer the fund to a miraculous 4,200% return over the 10 year span of the fund while the S&P 500 returned just 47%.

THE BUBBLE - A chronological re-ordering of the events and arguments of the bubble



Who Caused it. Who Called it. What’s Next.
Coming in Fall 2012, The Bubble asks the experts who predicted the current recession, “What happened and why?” Diving deep into the true causes of the financial crisis, renowned economists, investors and business leaders explain what America is facing if we don't learn from our past mistakes. The film poses the question: “Is the economy really improving or are we just blowing up another Bubble?”


A chronological re-ordering of the events and arguments of THE BUBBLE

PART 1: THE CAUSES

The Federal Reserve and Interest Rates


Low interest rates from the Federal Reserve enticed people to borrow savings that did not exist. Both the government and the artificially lowered interest rate diverted resources into housing, creating a bubble that would inevitably burst.
· Increased home prices encouraged home owners to borrow money based on their real estate price and accumulate more debt.
· When the market responded by forcing interest rates back up, these bubble projects failed. People realized they could not afford this lifestyle.


Government Guarantees

· Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were Government Sponsored Enterprises that subsidize and guarantee home mortgages. Their liabilities were implicitly guaranteed by the government, who nationalized them in September of 2008.

· Banks frequently underwrote bad mortgages and sold them on secondary markets created by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

· Commercial bank deposits are guaranteed by the FDIC, a highly leveraged government program that allows banks to take more risks.

· The Greenspan Put was the widespread belief in the market that Alan Greenspan would intervene to bail out the financial sector whenever threatened. This was based on his reaction to the Savings & Loan Crisis, the bailout of the Mexican Peso in the 90’s, the bailout of LTCM, the liquidity approaching Y2k, and his actions forcing the interest rate down to 1% for a full year after September 11th. This was later replaced with the even larger Bernanke Put.

Government Home Ownership Policies

· The mortgage income tax deduction artificially stimulated the real estate market and led to larger home purchases.

· The Basel regulations allowed banks to be more leveraged if they held mortgage loans and even more leveraged if they held mortgage backed securities.

· Presidents Clinton, Bush, and Obama have all attempted to decrease the down payment needed to buy homes.

Nontraditional Mortgages

· Includes both subprime loans (low credit score) and alt-a loans. (low down payment, adjustable rate, no doc)

· By 2008, half of all mortgages were nontraditional mortgages.

· Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac owned more nontraditional mortgages than the entire private sector.



Affordable Housing

· The Department of Housing & urban Development required Fannie and Freddie to allocate 50% of mortgages to individuals that were at or below the median income in their communities.

· The Community Reinvestment Act required mortgage lenders to fulfill a quota for low and moderate income home buyers in certain communities. Although it was expanded in the 1990’s, the role in the housing bubble was minor.

PART 2: PAST CRISES

Panic of 192
0

· The Depression of 1920 was worse than the first year of the Great Depression. Production fell 21%, GDP dropped 24% and unemployment went from 4% to 11.7%.

· The Federal Government cut spending in half from 1920 to 1922 and did not enact a stimulus policy.

· The Depression ended in the summer of 1921 and unemployment dropped to 6.7% in 1922 and 2.4% in 1923.

The Great Depression

· Nominal GDP was down 46% during the Great Depression.

· Both Herbert Hoover and Franklin Delano Roosevelt increased government spending while implementing wage and price controls, along with tariffs.

· The Great Depression lasted a decade and the economy did not recover until World War II was over.

Inflation In The 1970s

· America rapidly increased the money supply and abandoned the gold standard in 1971.

· The economy suffered a downturn and prices increased dramatically. The cost of oil alone went from $3 to $30 a barrel.

· To fight inflation, Federal Reserve chairman Paul Volcker allowed interest rates to rise, by slowing down money creation. This lowered price inflation from 13.5% at its peak to 3.2% in 1983.

· The high unemployment and high inflation of the 1970s was predicted by the Austrians, while the Keynesian school of economics believed that combination to be impossible.

PART 3: Response To The Current Crisis

Interest Rate Cuts


· The Federal Reserve has consistently lowered interest rates throughout the crisis.

· They have now pushed interest rates down to zero.


Bailouts

· Bear Stearns creditors were bailed out on March 14th, 2008, despite their investment bank being leveraged 35.5:1.

· Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were taken over by the government in September of 2008. This confirmed that their debt was guaranteed by the government. Treasury Secretary Paulson claimed in July 2008 that the companies were adequately capitalized despite only having $83 billion for $5 trillion in obligations.

· Although Lehman Brothers was allowed to fail, the rest of the financial sector was bailed out by the Federal Reserve, the Treasury department, and Congress.

· When Congress did not bail out the auto companies, President Bush did.

Stimulus Spending

· In February of 2008, following uncertainty in the Subprime mortgage market, George W. Bush signed a stimulus bill for over $152 billion dollars, attempting to get people to spend again.

· To support the housing market, George W. Bush signed the economic recovery act of 2008 which added $800 billion to the national debt.

· Following the bankruptcy of Washington Mutual and the bailout of AIG, George W. Bush signed the Trouble Asset Recovery Program which authorized the Treasury to buy up to $700 billion in bad assets.

· Due to the slow moving economy, newly elected President Obama continued George W. Bush’s spending spree by signing a $862 billion dollar stimulus bill.

PART 4: What America is Facing

Education Bubble


· Student loan debt’s version of Fannie Mae is called Sallie Mae.

· Student loans have spiked over a trillion dollars, more than all the car loans in the country combined.

· Graduates are finding they cannot pay back their loans with or without a job.

Coming Price Inflation

· Prices will dramatically rise due to the money created in response to the housing crash.

· Increased prices will lower the standard of living in the country.

· The devalued dollar resulting from inflation will wipe out savings for millions of Americans, particularly in the lower and middle classes.


National Debt Bubble

· The national debt approaching $16 trillion dollars is not sustainable.

· Foreign countries will stop buying Treasury bonds and interest rates will rise.

· Rising interest rates and deficits as far as the eye can see will lead to interest payments consuming the entire budget.

· America will be forced to cut spending.

Unfunded Liabilities Bubble

· The unfunded liabilities from Social Security and Medicare are as high as $119 Trillion Dollars.

· With the already high national debt, the federal government cannot absorb these added costs.

· Both Social Security and Medicare will be forced into bankruptcy. Defense will have to be cut.

Monday, October 1, 2012

Raw footage of Jim Rogers interview - The Bubble film

The Bubble is a feature length documentary that ask those who predicted the greatest recession since the Great Depression, why did it happen and what are we facing? The documentary is an adaptation of Tom Woods' New York Times bestseller Meltdown. Filmmaker Jimmy Morrison is releasing each interview in full for free before the film's release.


Thursday, September 20, 2012

A Gift to My Children: A Father's Lessons for Life and Investing

He’s the swashbuckling world traveler and legendary investor who made his fortune before he was forty. Now the bestselling author of A Bull in China, Hot Commodities, and Adventure Capitalist shares a heartfelt, indispensable guide for his daughters (and all young investors) to find success and happiness. In A Gift to My Children, Jim Rogers offers advice with his trademark candor and confidence, but this time he adds paternal compassion, protectiveness, and love. Rogers reveals how to learn from his triumphs and mistakes in order to achieve a prosperous, well-lived life. For example:

• Trust your own judgment: Rogers sensed China’s true potential way back in the 1980s, at a time when most analysts were highly skeptical of its prospects for growth.
• Focus on what you like: Rogers was five when he started collecting empty bottles at baseball games instead of playing.
• Be persistent: Coming to Yale from rural Alabama, and in over his head, Rogers never stopped studying and wound up with a scholarship to Oxford.
• See the world: In 1990, Rogers traveled through six continents by motorcycle, gaining a global perspective and learning how to evaluate prospects in rapidly developing countries such as Brazil, Russia, India, and China.
• Nothing is really new: anything deemed “innovative” or “unprecedented” is usually just overhyped, as in the case of the Internet or TV, airplanes, and railroads before it
• And not a bit off the subject, and very important: Boys will need you more than you’ll need them!

Wise and warm, accessible and inspiring, A Gift to My Children is a great gift for all those just starting to invest in their futures.

Author Biography : Born in 1942, Jim Rogers had his first job at age five, picking up bottles at baseball games. Winning a scholarship to Yale, Rogers was coxswain on the crew. Upon graduation, he attended Balliol College at Oxford. After a stint in the army, he began work on Wall Street. He cofounded the Quantum Fund, a global-investment partnership. During the next ten years, the portfolio gained more than 4,000 percent, while the S&P rose less than 50 percent. Rogers then decided to retire-at age thirty-seven-but he did not remain idle.Continuing to manage his own portfolio, Rogers served as a professor of finance at the Columbia Univer-sity Graduate School of Business and as moderator of The Dreyfus Roundtable on WCBS and The Profit Motive on FNN. At the same time, he laid the groundwork for his lifelong dream, an around-the-world motorcycle trip: more than 100,000 miles across six continents. That journey became the subject of Rogers's first book, Investment Biker (1994), now available from Random House Trade Paperbacks. While laying plans for his Millennium Adventure 1999-2001, he continued as a media commentator at Worth, CNBC, et al., and as a sometime professor.He now contributes to Fox News, Worth, and others as he and Paige eagerly await their first child. 

Bull in China

If the twentieth century was the American century, then the twenty-first century belongs to China. According to the one and only Jim Rogers, who’s been tracking the Chinese economy since he first went to China in 1984, any investor can get in on the ground floor of “the greatest economic boom since England’s Industrial Revolution.” But the time to act is now.

In A Bull in China, you’ll learn which industries offer the newest and best opportunities, from power, energy, and agriculture to tourism, water, and infrastructure. Rogers demystifies the state policies that are driving earnings and innovation, takes the intimidation factor out of the A-shares, B-shares, and ADRs of Chinese offerings, and profiles “Red Chip” companies, such as Yantai Changyu, China’s largest winemaker, which sells a “Healthy Liquor” line mixed with herbal medicines. Plus, if you want to export something to China yourself–or even buy land there–Rogers tells you the steps you need to take.

No other book–and no other author–can better help you benefit from the new Chinese revolution. Jim Rogers shows you how to make the “amazing energy, potential, and entrepreneurial spirit of a billion people” work for you.

Author Biography : Born in 1942, Jim Rogers had his first job at age five, picking up bottles at baseball games. Winning a scholarship to Yale, Rogers was coxswain on the crew. Upon graduation, he attended Balliol College at Oxford. After a stint in the army, he began work on Wall Street. He cofounded the Quantum Fund, a global-investment partnership. During the next ten years, the portfolio gained more than 4,000 percent, while the S&P rose less than 50 percent. Rogers then decided to retire-at age thirty-seven-but he did not remain idle.Continuing to manage his own portfolio, Rogers served as a professor of finance at the Columbia Univer-sity Graduate School of Business and as moderator of The Dreyfus Roundtable on WCBS and The Profit Motive on FNN. At the same time, he laid the groundwork for his lifelong dream, an around-the-world motorcycle trip: more than 100,000 miles across six continents. That journey became the subject of Rogers's first book, Investment Biker (1994), now available from Random House Trade Paperbacks. While laying plans for his Millennium Adventure 1999-2001, he continued as a media commentator at Worth, CNBC, et al., and as a sometime professor.He now contributes to Fox News, Worth, and others as he and Paige eagerly await their first child. 

Hot Commodities: How Anyone Can Invest Profitably in the World's Best Market

The next bull market is here. It’s not in stocks. It’s not in bonds. It’s in commodities –and some smart investors will be riding that bull to record returns in the next decade.

Before Jim Rogers hit the road to write his bestselling books Investment Biker and Adventure Capitalist, he was one of the world’s most successful investors. He cofounded the Quantum Fund and made so much money that he never needed to work again. Yet despite his success, Rogers has never written a book of practical investment advice–until now.

In Hot Commodities, Rogers offers the lowdown on the most lucrative markets for today and tomorrow. In 1998, gliding under the radar, a bull market in commodities began. Rogers thinks it’s going to continue for at least fifteen years–and he’s put his money where his mouth is: In 1998, he started his own commodities index fund. It’s up 165% since then, with more than $200 million invested, and it’s the single-best performing index fund in the world in any asset class. Less risky than stocks and less sluggish than bonds,, commodities are where the money is–and will be in the years ahead. Rogers’s strategies are simple and straightforward. You can start small–a few thousand dollars will suffice. It’s all about putting your money into stuff you understand, the basic materials of everyday life, like coal, sugar, cotton, corn, or crude oil. Once you recognize the cyclical and historical trading patterns outlined here, you’ll be on your way.

In language that is both colorful and accessible, but Rogers explains why the world of commodity investing can be one of the simplest of all–and how commodities are the bases by which investors can value companies, markets, and whole economies. To be a truly great investor is to know something about commodities.

For small investors and high rollers alike, Hot Commodities is as good as gold . . . or lead, or aluminum, which are some of the commodities Rogers says could be as rewarding for investors.

Author Biography : Born in 1942, Jim Rogers had his first job at age five, picking up bottles at baseball games. Winning a scholarship to Yale, Rogers was coxswain on the crew. Upon graduation, he attended Balliol College at Oxford. After a stint in the army, he began work on Wall Street. He cofounded the Quantum Fund, a global-investment partnership. During the next ten years, the portfolio gained more than 4,000 percent, while the S&P rose less than 50 percent. Rogers then decided to retire-at age thirty-seven-but he did not remain idle.Continuing to manage his own portfolio, Rogers served as a professor of finance at the Columbia Univer-sity Graduate School of Business and as moderator of The Dreyfus Roundtable on WCBS and The Profit Motive on FNN. At the same time, he laid the groundwork for his lifelong dream, an around-the-world motorcycle trip: more than 100,000 miles across six continents. That journey became the subject of Rogers's first book, Investment Biker (1994), now available from Random House Trade Paperbacks. While laying plans for his Millennium Adventure 1999-2001, he continued as a media commentator at Worth, CNBC, et al., and as a sometime professor.He now contributes to Fox News, Worth, and others as he and Paige eagerly await their first child. 

Adventure Capitalist

Drive . . . and grow rich!

The bestselling author of Investment Biker is back from the ultimate road trip: a three-year drive around the world that would ultimately set the Guinness record for the longest continuous car journey. In Adventure Capitalist, legendary investor Jim Rogers, dubbed “the Indiana Jones of finance” by Time magazine, proves that the best way to profit from the global situation is to see the world mile by mile. “While I have never patronized a prostitute,” he writes, “I know that one can learn more about a country from speaking to the madam of a brothel or a black marketeer than from meeting a foreign minister.”

Behind the wheel of a sunburst-yellow, custom-built convertible Mercedes, Rogers and his fiancée, Paige Parker, began their “Millennium Adventure” on January 1, 1999, from Iceland. They traveled through 116 countries, including many where most have rarely ventured, such as Saudi Arabia, Myanmar, Angola, Sudan, Congo, Colombia, and East Timor. They drove through war zones, deserts, jungles, epidemics, and blizzards. They had many narrow escapes.

They camped with nomads and camels in the western Sahara. They ate silkworms, iguanas, snakes, termites, guinea pigs, porcupines, crocodiles, and grasshoppers.

Best of all, they saw the real world from the ground up—the only vantage point from which it can be truly understood—economically, politically, and socially.

Here are just a few of the author’s conclusions:

• The new commodity bull market has started.
• The twenty-first century will belong to China.
• There is a dramatic shortage of women developing in Asia.
• Pakistan is on the verge of disintegrating.
• India, like many other large nations, will break into several countries.
• The Euro is doomed to fail.
• There are fortunes to be made in Angola.
• Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are a scam.
• Bolivia is a comer after decades of instability, thanks to gigantic amounts of natural gas.

Adventure Capitalist is the most opinionated, sprawling, adventurous journey you’re likely to take within the pages of a book—the perfect read for armchair adventurers, global investors, car enthusiasts, and anyone interested in seeing the world and understanding it as it really is.
Author Biography : Born in 1942, Jim Rogers had his first job at age five, picking up bottles at baseball games. Winning a scholarship to Yale, Rogers was coxswain on the crew. Upon graduation, he attended Balliol College at Oxford. After a stint in the army, he began work on Wall Street. He cofounded the Quantum Fund, a global-investment partnership. During the next ten years, the portfolio gained more than 4,000 percent, while the S&P rose less than 50 percent. Rogers then decided to retire-at age thirty-seven-but he did not remain idle.Continuing to manage his own portfolio, Rogers served as a professor of finance at the Columbia Univer-sity Graduate School of Business and as moderator of The Dreyfus Roundtable on WCBS and The Profit Motive on FNN. At the same time, he laid the groundwork for his lifelong dream, an around-the-world motorcycle trip: more than 100,000 miles across six continents. That journey became the subject of Rogers's first book, Investment Biker (1994), now available from Random House Trade Paperbacks. While laying plans for his Millennium Adventure 1999-2001, he continued as a media commentator at Worth, CNBC, et al., and as a sometime professor.He now contributes to Fox News, Worth, and others as he and Paige eagerly await their first child.

Jim Rogers Blog: The Solution Is Not Papering It Over

Jim Rogers Blog: The Solution Is Not Papering It Over: A recent video interview with Reuters. Jim Rogers is an author, financial commentator and successful international investor. He has bee...

video


International investor Jim Rogers says all that the Fed has done with QE is to artificially inflate stock and bond markets. He argues the Fed could push the U.S. into another recession in 2013. (September 12, 2012)